Erin Ramos

Me after staying up all night looking up genomic terms in our new Talking Glossary. go.usa.gov/xum8S Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

Here is the info for the roundtable discussion, where scientists and scholars will talk about connections between genomic technologies and the legacies of eugenics: go.usa.gov/xuyur

In the meantime, we recommend you check out this post from @NIH_EDI: edi.nih.gov/blog/communiti…. We will be posting links to other resources on this topic in the coming days, including many written by our roundtable panelists.

We’ve put your question in the queue for the roundtable, and asked our NHGRI historian Christopher Donohue to help provide insight from the perspective of the history of disability and how ableism can coincide with eugenics.

@JillEscher A great question with a complex answer, which is why we’re hosting a roundtable to get into the history and present-day context. Eugenics is more than sterilization, and it’s important to understand current forms of eugenics in order to combat it. twitter.com/jillescher/sta…

Me after staying up all night looking up genomic terms in our new Talking Glossary. go.usa.gov/xum8S

test Twitter Media - Me after staying up all night looking up genomic terms in our new Talking Glossary. https://t.co/iwYElHyzXt https://t.co/oa9buyfU5m

As research into genetics and genomics advances, scientists need to work to dismantle and confront ableism, eugenics and racism, which still exist at the NIH, in science and in society. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

Using one reference genome to study all humans isn’t fetch at all. It can’t possibly represent everyone! That’s why researchers are working to create a “pangenome,” a collection of complete genomes in which everyone’s differences are represented. go.usa.gov/xeMzw Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

The unique structure of chromosomes keeps DNA tightly wound around spool-like proteins called histones. Without this, DNA molecules would be too long to fit inside cells! Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

Genomics must be a revolutionary science, not a reactionary one. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

Genetics and genomics are both important in health, but what is the difference between them? Genetics refers to the study of inheritance and the ways that traits or conditions are passed down from one generation to another. Genomics describes the study of all of a person's DNA. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

If all of the DNA molecules in a single human cell were unwound from their histones and placed end-to-end, they would stretch 6 feet! #GenomeFacts go.usa.gov/xuvEn

The unique structure of chromosomes keeps DNA tightly wound around spool-like proteins called histones. Without this, DNA molecules would be too long to fit inside cells!

They will also consider how the science community can quickly adapt these new technologies. Join us May 24-26 for this free event! nih.zoomgov.com/meeting/regist…

We are teaming up with @NIEHS for a virtual workshop all about RNA sequencing! Researchers will discuss the sequencing technology that is needed to capture the molecular diversity and cellular context of RNA.

.@Genome_gov has a funding opportunity to help diversify genomic data science education! go.usa.gov/xuuMT Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

This will be done through a cloud-based educational Hub that will engage with minority-serving institutions and help students from underrepresented populations learn about computational genomics and data science! go.usa.gov/xuuMT

.@Genome_gov has a funding opportunity to help diversify genomic data science education! go.usa.gov/xuuMT

Genomics is increasingly becoming more accessible in healthcare. Newborn screening involves analyzing blood metabolites as a means to screen for a few dozen genetic diseases, while whole-genome sequencing has the potential to screen newborns for many hundreds of genetic diseases. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

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Dana Crawford

Professor of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences and Associate Director of the Cleveland Institute for Computational Biology, with interest in pharmacogenomics, electronic health records, and diverse populations. Also, an avid foodie!