Erin Ramos

In 1998, scientists with the Human Genome Project, including Bob Waterston, sequenced a roundworm — the first animal to ever be sequenced! Sequencing the genomes of animals helped scientists better understand the human genome sequence. This is an example of comparative genomics! Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

In general, animals are less tolerant of chromosomal changes than plants. Many plants can acquire extra sets of chromosomes and not be harmed. In fact, for some plants, duplication of chromosomes has been a critical step in genome evolution! Plant-astic. #HolidayGenomeFacts

test Twitter Media - In general, animals are less tolerant of chromosomal changes than plants. Many plants can acquire extra sets of chromosomes and not be harmed. In fact, for some plants, duplication of chromosomes has been a critical step in genome evolution! Plant-astic. #HolidayGenomeFacts https://t.co/e2NN9qy8Ja

The sequencing technology in the beginning stages of the Human Genome Project was challenging. Thankfully, the researchers finally got internet access by the late 90s! Hopefully they never accidentally sent an NSYNC CD. #HolidayGenomeFacts Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

The sequencing technology in the beginning stages of the Human Genome Project was challenging. Thankfully, the researchers finally got internet access by the late 90s! Hopefully they never accidentally sent an NSYNC CD. #HolidayGenomeFacts

test Twitter Media - The sequencing technology in the beginning stages of the Human Genome Project was challenging. Thankfully, the researchers finally got internet access by the late 90s! Hopefully they never accidentally sent an NSYNC CD. #HolidayGenomeFacts https://t.co/bjobtqKHgj

Each snowflake is unique, right? Well, we don’t know about snowflakes, but we do know DNA — and each DNA sequence in a person is unique! Even though 99.9% of our sequences are the same, each person’s sequence has slight differences, called genomic variants. #HolidayGenomeFacts

test Twitter Media - Each snowflake is unique, right? Well, we don’t know about snowflakes, but we do know DNA — and each DNA sequence in a person is unique! Even though 99.9% of our sequences are the same, each person’s sequence has slight differences, called genomic variants. #HolidayGenomeFacts https://t.co/erwYmYxkHI

.@Genome_gov wishes you a Happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for you, which is why we will post fun genomic facts for you to share with your family! They will see what genomic experts you are, and what could be better than that? #HolidayGenomeFacts

Do eugenics and scientific racism still exist today? Tragically, yes. Eugenics practices have caused widespread harm, particularly to marginalized populations. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

We heard you, @GiGiomics, @kwsaylor, @baym, @pathogenomenick and all you other DNA and GBBO superfans -- thanks for commenting on how we missed the mark on that technical challenge. Help us out: What's a better analogy for how DNA makes us each unique?

Dr. Johanna Schoen will present on race and reproduction for @genome_gov’s symposium, “The Meaning of Eugenics: Historical and Present-Day Discussions of Eugenics and Scientific Racism.” Join us December 2-3 for this free event: go.usa.gov/xexQ7

According to @RugtersU professor Dr. Johanna Schoen, eugenics in America was concerned with poverty, ill health, sexual morality and even the money that the government spent on social programs. Eugenics was prevalent in America well before World War II.

Did you know that the genome sequences of any two people are roughly 99.9% identical? Across the human population, those seemingly small differences (called genomic variants) account for the genomic diversity of our species. Retweeted by National Human Genome Research Institute

Dr. Stern will discuss eugenics and sterilization in the United States as a part of @genome_gov’s symposium, “The Meaning of Eugenics: Historical and Present-Day Discussions of Eugenics and Scientific Racism.” Join us December 2-3 for this free event: go.usa.gov/xexQ7

Eugenicists deemed many groups “unfit,” especially those who were perceived to have intellectual, mental or physical disabilities.

What is eugenics? Dr. Alexandra Minna Stern, a history professor at @UMich, says it has always involved the stigmatization and dehumanization of groups defined as unfit or unworthy.

Learn more in our new Genomics and Virology Fact Sheet: go.usa.gov/xekcx

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Dana Crawford

Professor of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences and Associate Director of the Cleveland Institute for Computational Biology, with interest in pharmacogenomics, electronic health records, and diverse populations. Also, an avid foodie!