Do race and age vary in non-malignant central nervous system tumor incidences in the United States?

Epidemiological analyses of many cancers have demonstrated differences in incidence and outcome for patients from different racial backgrounds. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of non-malignant CNS tumors by race and age to identify incidence variance. Data from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) from 2009 to 2013 were used to calculate age-adjusted incidence rates (IR) per 100,000 population and 95% confidence intervals for selected tumors overall, by race, age group, and race stratified by age group. In those aged 0-14 years, Whites had significantly greater IR of neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumors (IR  0.37) compared to Others (IR  0.26) and Blacks (IR  0.24). In those 15-39 years, Blacks had significantly greater IR of tumors of the pituitary (IR  3.80) than Others (IR  3.29) and Whites (IR  3.15), and significantly greater IR of grade I meningioma (IR  1.93) than Whites (IR  1.59) and Others (IR  1.21). In those 40 years and older, Blacks had significantly greater IR of grade I meningioma (IR  19.16) compared to Whites (IR  15.77) and Others (IR  15.32), and significantly greater IR of tumors of the pituitary (IR  10.47) than Others (IR  5.85) and Whites (IR  4.99). Others had significantly greater IR of nerve sheath tumors (IR  4.00) compared to Whites (IR  3.46) and Blacks (IR  1.64). The incidence of non-malignant CNS tumors differs significantly by race and age in the USA. These differences may contribute to previously-described health outcome disparities.

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Will Bush

Will Bush

William S. Bush, Ph.D., is a human geneticist and bioinformatician, and Assistant Professor within the Institute for Computational Biology and the Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.